General

December 2017 Newsletter

Howdy!

Wishing you and yours a good holiday season, whether or not you will be celebrating this year. Everybody deserves to be comfortable and well fed, no?

I will be closing commissions until May 1st. It is that time of year when the continuing education classes for my job are open and I have to study for the six tests I have to pass to stay employed. Between kids, holidays, and school, I’m not even going to have enough time to sleep regularly.

Hope to hear from you soon! Be safe!


Current Specials

None
Commissions will be closed from December 1st to May 1st.

All sales, discounts, and promotions are applied before shipping charges.


Question and Answer Spotlight

Q: “What is a fixative?”

A: In short, varnish. Similar to the stuff woodworkers put on their products to protect the wood or to the clearcoat women put on their nails. Artistic fixative comes in a spraycan to keep from drenching the paper and is available in varying levels of matte and glossiness.

Standard Available Sizes:

4″x6″ – 5″x7″ – 8″x10″ – 9″x12″ – 11″x14″ – 14″x17″ – 16″x20″ – 18″x24″

Ask about custom sizes.

Children & Adults, Pets & Animals, Houses & Buildings, Fantasy Alterations

Birthdays, Weddings, Anniversaries, Memorials, Graduations, Promotions, Holidays

Any special occasion and normal occasions!

Order at: Ashe’s Site | Etsy | eBay

Visit Website | Follow RSS Feed | Follow on Facebook | Privacy Policy

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November 2017 Newsletter

Howdy!

Be warm, be safe, and whether or not you celebrate Thanksgiving, I hope you have a good holiday.

Hope to hear from you soon! Be safe!


Current Specials

Halloween
10% off all orders that are Halloween themed, excluding Character Sketches.
October 15th to November 15th.
Christmas Sale
10% off all orders that are Christmas, Hanukkah, or Saturnalia themed or to be gifted, excluding Character Sketches.
November 1st toNovember 30th.

All sales, discounts, and promotions are applied before shipping charges.


Question and Answer Spotlight

Q: “What kind of tablet do you use?”

A: From 2004 to 2011 I used a Wacom Graphire 4. After it died I started using a Wacom Intuos 2. I miss my Graphire 4. It had buttons I could program to Save and Undo. The Intuos 2 has eight on there somewhere you have to tap with the stylus and it’s terribly annoying. I’m looking forward to buying a different model some day. I do not like pad computers due to their lack of a real keyboard and I will not own one.

Standard Available Sizes:

4″x6″ – 5″x7″ – 8″x10″ – 9″x12″ – 11″x14″ – 14″x17″ – 16″x20″ – 18″x24″

Ask about custom sizes.

Children & Adults, Pets & Animals, Houses & Buildings, Fantasy Alterations

Birthdays, Weddings, Anniversaries, Memorials, Graduations, Promotions, Holidays

Any special occasion and normal occasions!

Order at: Ashe’s Site | Etsy | eBay

Visit Website | Follow RSS Feed | Follow on Facebook | Privacy Policy

Little Art Questionnaire

In one of my art circles this little questionnaire was posted regarding the decision to become a professional artist. I liked it, so I thought I’d repost it here.

Were you lost? What questions did you ask yourself? Did your family support your decision or tell you to find a “real” job?
I never wanted to be a professional artist. I didn’t have any friends because everybody thought I was too weird and odd for them to be worth hanging out with. My only friends were my books, my pets, and my art. And I guess my relatives. For the longest it was just me, my mother, and my sister since my dad had to work a lot to keep heart and soul together. We got to see our grandparents most weekends.

So art was something very personal to me and to draw for money felt the equivalent of whoring myself out. My family thought I was pretty good and should draw for money. Thankfully most of them respected my decision to let my art be something personal and dear to me until I after I married and had somebody who liked me for me.

How difficult was it for you to actually support yourself once you decided that drawing would be your life?
HARD. On the one hand you’ve got these $1000 for 16″x20″ photo-realistic oil painting artists, and then on the other are these teenaged bottom feeder artists drawing an 8″x10″ for $5 or less. Both of them make it hard to set fair prices without turning customers away because they are two very extreme ends of the price spectrum and make the middle ground hard to find. If you set your prices too low, nobody thinks you’re any good and won’t hire you or they’ll only hire you so long as you’re dirt cheap. If you set your prices too high, nobody can afford you or don’t think you’re worth your price tag.

My first year was spent working at $3/hour and working myself into the ground just to keep my family together. It’s hard to support a family of three on $50/week. My husband couldn’t help at the time because of his health. That gives you a bit of an extra incentive to try and make it as an artist. A little bit of something is better than nothing.

Did you take on many jobs and draw in your spare time? Were you quite poor before breaking through? Did you quit, did you choose to take a “safer” path in life?
I’ve chosen a safe route. I’m working hard as an accountant and as an artist, and trying to build them both up. So I work two jobs. Three, depending on how you look at it.

I’m in income tax preparer, so that is my main income and pays the bulk of my bills. Should the IRS decide to do away with income tax preparers like they talk about from time to time, I can still do bookkeeping and art.

I’m a bookkeeper during the rest of the year, and that provides a trickle of income. If I never get another bookkeeping client or lose what few I have due to them going out of business or something, I have income taxes and art to fall back on.

I’m an artist in my free time. It’s not much, but every little bit helps. If nobody wants portraits, at least there are taxes and record keeping to do.

Some years I make more as a bookkeeper, sometimes I make more as an artist. Neither can yet compete with what I bring in as an income tax preparer. I’m still broke as hell though, all three of them are pretty young and require a lot of work to build them up. But so long as I stick to it, we’ll be alright.

You CAN SPAM anybody. Sort of.

One of the hardest things about creating newsletters is complying with the Can Spam Act.

As some have joked, “yeah, you can spam anybody now”. So long as you put a mailing address and phone number at the bottom, you can harass whomever you want. Probably because then if you annoy them enough they can hire a hitman to find you or perhaps sign you up for all sorts of garbage if you give them a reliable way of contacting you outside of email.

While I have had some issues with getting signed up for junk by dishonorable businesses that think their mandatory request for my email means they can irritate me with every Harry, Dick, and Tom they know, it’s more of a privacy concern on my part. With a husband and son to also consider, I feel it’s irresponsible to pass out my physical address to anybody and everybody. I am saving up for a PO box, but at this time that is a luxury I honestly can’t afford.

And as far as the phone number is concerned, that’s a whole ‘nother ball game. I have a disorder that leads to severe comprehension issues with disembodied verbal communication. That means that if you call me, I have no clue what you’re saying if I can’t see you, and even then it can be dodgy. On a good day I can bluff my way through and make you think I know what you’re talking about over the phone and if I’m lucky I may actually know what the phone conversation was about. But in reality, I’m just a confused person holding a little piece of plastic that’s making weird noises and hoping it will stop soon.

For both of those reasons, I do not include either contact method on either my website or my emails. I may include my city and state location, and some day I will put the PO box up. I will never have a phone number listed.